Feb 21, 2013
Door Time: 7:00 PM

Day: Thursday, February 21, 2013
Door Time: 7:00 PM
Age: All Ages
Advance Ticket Price: $22
Day Of Show Price: $24
Buy Tickets

10 Years
The members of 10 Years might not have used the word crossroads when they began the making of their newest Universal Republic album, but all would concur the wolf was at the door. Figuratively and literally – agree frontman Jesse Hasek and bassist Lewis Cosby; Fighting off the most unforgiving of predatory assaults that comes with the territory of a respected, veteran band like 10 Years who bears the scars of every battle won or lost along the way.

The close-knit members’ core creed has always demanded they set their own standards – answering only to their collective challenges as a band, wolves and industry naysayers…be damned.

The difference this time is they called on all their might. And more than a little wisdom.

The aptly titled result – Feeding The Wolves – thunders out from their storm-charred legacy as the heaviest album they’ve made in nearly a decade, a gift to loyal fans long promised darker hues from the Tennessee band, and maybe a much needed ‘opening’ for a rock world starving for some kick-ass direction, of late. Ominous songs such as “Shoot It Out,” “The Wicked Ones,” and “Now Is The Time” sound and feel as if they can stop bullets, spreading the kind of musical shards and shrapnel that only a band in peak, 10 Years’ condition can deliver.
“I’ve enjoyed every album we’ve made for different reasons,” says Jesse. “We never want to make the same record twice, but this one started with a kind of aggressive edge and ended with that same energy that really felt special. We worked hard not to take that ‘edge’ off. We kept the integrity of the songs by keeping them aggressive.” Lewis seconds the notion: “We’ve been saying for years we wanted to get back to a heavier, darker sound and then by the time we’d go into the studio, things would change. This time nothing changed. There was always that kick-ass feeling in the room, coupled with some things we haven’t done before.”

Producer Howard Benson (Seether, Flyleaf) was chosen to helm the proceedings, another integral component to locking down the 10 Years magic that had made them one of the world’s most enigmatic live and studio bands. “He understood where we were at and where we wanted to go,” says Lewis. “He was perfect for this ‘big’ sounding kind of record,” states Jesse.
Ironically, both Jesse and Lewis also cite the ‘drift’ after 2008’s prophetically titled Division - an album that was made after nearly two years on the road – as another factor in the path back to 10 Years’ reclamation: A trial by fire and those not-as-obvious corrosive elements that can whittle away at a band’s interior compass. The entire period became emblematic of the push-and-pull going on within 10 Years, truly a band that was stretched to its limits. “I think every band who has some success goes through it,” says Lewis. “But there were days after a show where I’d actually wonder ‘was this our last?’ We went through all kinds of changes during the Division cycle. Personnel changes, management changes – a lot of negativity rippling through our camp. We even made that record outside Seattle where we ended up only feeling more disconnected. We eventually decided to take some time away and get some perspective.”
A clean break can be cathartic – but never a guarantee that the players will reconvene on the same page. The band promised themselves before gathering for this album that getting back into that rehearsal room with their collective ‘headspace’ intact was priority number one. “There was just a feeling in the air that we were going to come hard on this one,” says Lewis. “We even gathered 3 weeks prior, in a rehearsal space in L.A. before we were scheduled to record, which was unusual for us. The fire in the belly was back.”
And as fate would have it, inspirational flames were also heating up the 10 Years furnace courtesy of the rehearsal room next door. “They probably don’t even know what it meant to us, but Rage Against The Machine was playing in the room next to us,” says Jesse. “We could just feel the sound coming out of the there. You have to understand, they, along with bands like Metallica and Nirvana and the Deftones were what we grew up on. To hear them killing it like that – I know it affected us.”

Lewis says the enthusiasm was palpable. “We were like kids, saying “’God, did you just hear that?’ I realized everything that was coming out of them was so riff-heavy. Our album was heading in that same direction. It was like a sign. We were so pumped. We arrived in LA with songs already written, yet here we were, so inspired, I bet we wrote five more in there that ended up on the album. We were on a mission on this one.”

A communal slugfest that also ended up being their most collaborative effort. “The way we write has always been an open door,” says Jesse. “We just kicked it down this time. Brian would bring in a guitar part, or I’d have some verses, but we were more methodical. We even went down a lot of avenues that didn’t end up on the record, but we went down them all together.”
Such crucial threads are pulled tight on songs like the bristling “Shoot It Out,” fanning the ‘feeding the wolves’ premise that came to represent some of the band’s ferocious themes on the new album. “We’re not just talking about the stereotypical ‘wolves’ in the music industry,” says Jesse. “Everybody on the planet has bigger dreams than just sitting around waiting to die. Sometimes you have to put yourself on the line for those dreams. You are out there – but so are the ‘wolves’ waiting to feed.” “And they can bleed you dry,” adds Lewis. Jesse confirms it was easy to work on that song as a band because the group was so in sync with the motivation behind it. “We’ve been through the ringer, where if you give people an inch they will take a mile,” he says. Another song that throws down the 10 Years gauntlet is the impenetrable “Fix Me.” “I think it’s going to be one of the songs that grabs people from the start,” says Lewis – fueled by lyrics that just may be slyly revealing the 10 Years hidden-code: ‘I’m fine in the fire/I feed on the friction/I’m right where I should be/Don’t try and fix me…/
If there has ever been a band comfortable about being appreciated solely on its merits – about being accepted ‘as is,’ that band is 10 Years.

Ever since 2001, when the group replaced their original vocalist with Jesse Hasek, 10 Years seemed to sense that being armed with signature sound and fury would eventually gain them one of the most loyal audiences in rock. In 2004, they released the indie missile Killing All That Holds You, featuring the now-classic “Wasteland” and “Through the Iris,” and netted them their major label debut with Universal Republic. Their acclaimed 2005 effort, The Autumn Effect, snagged them massive radio and video play, established their rabid audience, and handed them prime touring spots with bands such as Disturbed, Breaking Benjamin, Mudvayne and Sevendust. Later, torrid live-runs with Linkin Park, Korn and the Deftones, further cemented their reputation as one of the most credible live acts of the decade.

Division arrived in 2008, with the aforementioned trials mentioned by Lewis, and a baptism via rock n’ roll bullshit that might have annihilated lesser bands. “No need to go into it,” says Jesse. “It’s why I take my little digital recorder around. I’m always observing, always getting ideas. I find a corner and get ‘em down on tape. If I’m lucky, they sometimes blossom into songs.”
Known as a wordsmith who can hang with the best of them, but for also leaving room for the listener to interpret his riveting observations wrapped around the
scorching guitar treads of band co-founder Brian Vodinh, Hasek has also been humbled by simply being around his first child.

“Change isn’t always bad,” he says. “Most of the changes we have gone through have made us better people and a better band. The band-part takes all of us working hard to make the kind of music we know we are capable of. I think we did that on this one.”

Lewis says it was all about coming to the same conclusion without making any pronouncements. “It’s the most cooperative thing we’ve ever done by far. It’s like we all had the same epiphany without really having to talk about it too much. You’d be cheating yourself if you don’t sit down and listen to the entire album. We left it all there for everyone to hear.”
http://www.10yearsmusic.com
https://www.facebook.com/10yearsmusic

Young Guns
Over the course of the past few years, the London-based YOUNG GUNS have emerged as one of the UK's most electrifying new bands, garnering heavy radio play and UK chart success, while playing to packed-house crowds all across Europe, including a main stage performance at the Reading Festival, where they tore up the stage as part of a lineup that included Arcade Fire, Queens of the Stone Age, Guns N' Roses and Modest Mouse.

New album BONES has already achieved critical acclaim overseas, with Q Magazine and Kerrang! each giving it four stars and the latter writing that the album sees the band "giving themselves the best shot possible of taking on all comers and winning." BONES and its title track were also nominated for "Best Album" and "Best Single" as part of this year's 2012 Kerrang! Awards.

“We've written something that I feel happy describing as 'brave,'” says Young Guns frontman Gustav Wood, “and it will challenge a lot of people's preconceptions about what sort of band we are. It's an ambitious record, and we have the ambition to match the sound.”

Written over a number of months in places ranging from Thailand to Spain to a shed in the band's hometown of High Wycombe, UK, BONES marks Young Guns' transition from a band packed with potential to bonafide contenders for the title of Britain's best. It's a stirring album full of contradictions – it speaks of strength and vulnerability, friendship and loss, energetic youth and heavy-hearted experience – that proudly displays Wood, John Taylor (guitar), Fraser Taylor (guitar), Simon Mitchell (bass) and Ben Jolliffe (drums)'s skyscraping vision and style.

“When you're writing an album you need to believe that what you're doing is the most important thing in the world,” continues Gustav.

Having formed from the ashes of a variety of local bands, Young Guns' first release was the striking Mirrors EP in June 2009. But it wasn't until debut album All Our Kings Are Dead, unveiled in July 2010, that they began to really show what they were capable of. Backed by a groundswell of popular support, the band hit magazine covers, headlined the HMV Forum in London, toured Australia and played the Main Stage at Reading and Leeds Festivals; in the backs of their minds, though, they knew they could do better. And they were right.

Taken at face value, BONES feels effortless, but the work that went into it – the long hours, the nudging back of immutable deadlines, the worry, the sheer grind that comes with a genuinely democratic writing process – mirrors the band's career to date. This is a story of victory by inches, not of instant boom (and inevitable, sad bust).

Young Guns backed themselves into a corner with their drive to comprehensively outdo All Our Kings Are Dead. After a handful of fruitless writing sessions, Gustav, Fraser and John spent a night in the studio with a couple of bottles of vodka and the desire to write a song their heroes would be proud of; when morning eventually came, they had the skeleton of “Dearly Departed,” a song that, once they'd taken it to the rest of the band and let them work their magic, would sit as one of the keystones of BONES. “Once we wrote that song, we knew we could really make a mark with this album,” says Wood. The title track itself is another standout moment, a pure rock anthem in the most heroic sense.

“When you do something you know is good, that you know stands up... it's bliss. Elation. We worked so hard on this album, and there were times when the stress was horrendous. When I finished tracking the vocals for 'Bones’ and we stood back and cranked it on the stereo at 4am, listening to what I knew would be a single that would do big things for us, that was overwhelming.”

From then on, the songs flowed: the title track, a howl of defiance; stunning opener “I Was Born, I Have Lived, I Will Surely Die,” a fearless statement of intent; lead single “Learn My Lesson,” a calling-card that's as dynamic as it is catchy.

“It feels like I want to just kick people's heads off,” smiles Gustav. “It sounds stupid but I just want to get out there and make a mark – it keeps me up at night, thinking about how much I want to do.”

https://www.facebook.com/younggunsuk

Inelements
InelementsInelements is a five-piece alternative metal band originating from Colorado Springs, Colorado. Inelements is: vocalist Steven “Huk” Huckaby, guitarist Matt Tuttle, bassist Nolan Campbell, drummer Ryan Barber and guitarist Eric Madrid. Inelements was formed in 2007, when close friends Matt and Ryan began a search for additional members to form their project. Huk joined the band in late 2007, and Nolan was brought on in February of the following year. Over the next few years, the band developed their skills as artists and song writers, releasing their first EP, We’re Waiting, in the summer of 2009. The album release announced the beginning of Inelements’ first tour, a self-promoted and self-booked venture spanning two weeks and seven states in June of 2009.
The following two years were filled with a wide selection of multi-level performances as Inelements continued to increase their local fan-base while sharing stages with several national performers, including Drowning Pool, 10 Years, Saving Abel, Framing Hanley, HURT and Sick Puppies. In July of 2011, after nine months of studio production, the band’s second album, Post Stress, was released. Post Stress marked the beginning of Inelements’ new direction, one that would put the band back on the road, exposing new audiences to their music. In the same month, Eric Madrid, a close friend of the band who produced We're Waiting, was welcomed to Inelements as guitarist. Over time, Inelements has become a staple of local music in the Colorado Springs area. Through music and determination, Inelements continues to expand their artistic influence with each day.
http://www.inelementsband.com/
http://www.facebook.com/Inelements
www.reverbnation.com/inelements