Highly Suspect

94.3 KILO Presents

Highly Suspect

And the Kids

Sat Apr 08 2017

8:00 pm

$27.00

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This event is all ages

*Any Tickets Purchased over the maximum are subject to be refunded without notice*

Highly Suspect
Highly Suspect
It happened in Brooklyn. In 2011, the members of Highly Suspect arrived in the borough from their native Cape Cod, MA. The next four years became a whirlwind of sex, drugs, and more rock 'n' roll than most people could ever handle. Then again, Johnny Stevens [vocals, guitar] and twin brothers Rich [bass, vocals] and Ryan Meyer [drums] aren't "most people." Those chemically-soaked nights, hazier mornings, broken relationships, and cathartic realizations leave residue across Highly Suspect's full-length debut album, Mister Asylum [300 Entertainment], and it's inebriating in the best way possible.
The boys moved into a studio apartment with "no electricity yet," getting a cheap rate as Rich promised to add an elevated loft with five bedrooms. He made good on his promise and even launched his own contracting company that would fuel the band's exploits for the foreseeable future. As they slowly but surely made a name for themselves locally, Johnny cataloged experiences in the moment, either putting pen to paper in his notebook or using his phone's memos.

"This album is a collection of everything that happened from the time I moved to Brooklyn onward," says Johnny. "I met Lydia the first week we were here. She was the only girl in the building. It was Lydia and her roommates and us. She kicked everything off for me. The album is a reflection of our experiences. Shit, New York is the dream. On Cape Cod, I'd wake up at five in the morning, work out, surf, and smoke a ton of weed. In New York, you're staying up until five in the morning, and the weed is now cocaine. It's a nocturnal life and a totally different thing. I lived it pretty fucking hard and had to write about it."

Their D.I.Y. music video for the drowsy, dirty, and dirge-y blues rocker "Bath Salts"—which Johnny penned after "overdosing on a huge combination of shit"—drummed up a major buzz online and attracted the band's current management. They cut another independent EP with Gojira singer and guitarist Joseph Duplantier behind the board. Continuing to slug it out live, they eventually caught the attention of 300 Entertainment in 2014 who signed the trio as its flagship rock outfit.

Following the signing, Highly Suspect entered Studio G in Brooklyn with Hamilton and cut Mister Asylum to tape. They tapped into something real, rigid, and raw that instantly resonated.

Upon release, the record debuted at #22 on the Billboard Top 200, selling over 9,100 copies and making it one of the "top three biggest selling rock debuts by a new act in 2015." Rolling Stone,Entertainment Weekly, Billboard, The Fader, and more praised the group, and they shared stages with the likes of Faith No More, Jane's Addiction, Deftones, Eagles of Death Metal, My Morning Jacket, Grizzly Bear and more and lit up festivals such as Lollapalooza and Bonnaroo.

The infectious grit and grime of songs like the single "Lydia" heralded the band's presence. Ryan and Rich lock into a creeping rhythmic stomp as Johnny's eternally haunted vocals transfix.
And the Kids
Growing up, often the safest haven to plot your dreams and get a handle on your identity is within the confines of trusted friendships. For the musicians in the critically acclaimed band And The Kids, these bonds have been a life raft. But as friendships evolve from adolescence to young adulthood, sometimes the lines between friends, lovers and all that comes in between can grow murky. On the Northampton, MA-based band's latest, Friends Share Lovers (out June 3rdon Signature Sounds), And The Kids examines blurred boundaries in close-knit relationships. "The friends we grew up with were troublemakers, lost souls, dropouts, and mother figures," says And The Kids guitarist and vocalist Hannah Mohan. "The title references the incestuousness of friend groups and how things get messy."And The Kids channel existential crises into pop euphoria. With this sleight of hand, the quartet manages to conjure chunky indie rock, blissful new wave, chamber folk, jarring avant-garde, and brawny classic rock. Mohan navigates this expansive creativity with aplomb. Effortlessly she swoops heavenly for high tones, digs deep for swaggering rock n' roll low tones, and manages to mash up sweet sass with new wave bliss for a vocal feel that masks sage wisdom beneath sweet innocence. In addition to Mohan, And The Kids is Rebecca Lasaponaro on drums, Megan Miller on synthesizers and percussion, and bassist Taliana Katz. The quartet's beginnings couldn't be better scripted: Mohan and Lasaponaro met in band class in seventh grade. A few years later, the duo dropped out of school and found themselves at a learning center that provided them with a free rehearsal space. There they practiced everyday, inspired by such diverse artists as Modest Mouse, Rilo Kiley, The Doors, and The Police, among others. Those formative moments in friendship and music have been everlasting. In 2012, the fledging duo met Meghan when the three were interns at the Institute for the Musical Arts in Goshen, MA, and soon after welcomed her into the band. Recently, Miller has battled visa problems as a Canadian citizen and has been forced out of the United States for five years. To show the strength of their bonds as friends and artists, And The Kids chose to record Friends Share Lovers in Montreal so that Miller could participate. Recently, the trio added bassist Taliana Katz, a close and trusted friend who also attended IMA, to maintain a full sound live in Miller's forced absence from American touring. For four years, And The Kids has worked tirelessly to nurture its artistic vision and finesse its live performances. The band has gone from basement shows, open mics, and gigs at pizza joints to becoming an "on the verge" artist. And The Kids has released two EPs, two full-length records, and shared the stage with Rubblebucket, Sallie Ford, Lake Street Dive and Mother Falcon. Recent and upcoming live performance highlights include SXSW and a tour with Ra Ra Riot and PWR BTTM. The band will head out on a headlining tour in June bookended by summer festival dates. Along the way, And The Kids has garnered acclaim from NPR Music, The Wall Street Journal, andThe Boston Globe, among many others. Indie tastemakers Pitchfork enthuse: "And the Kids are among the Western Mass. indie scene's brightest creative lights." Friends Share Lovers is an epiphanic entry in the band's catalog as it showcases the group's roiling emotionality in wider artistic palette settings. This album explores the power of sound sculpting with studio effects like reverb, majestic keyboard passages, and stacks of pillowy vocal harmonies.
Ironically, the songs on Friends Share Lovers began as compact compositions with spare instrumentation. With keyboardist and percussionist Miller stranded in Canada, Mohan and Lasaponaro workshopped their new material as a duo. But, when it came time to record, they chose Canada as a show of solidarity to their bandmate Miller. With Miller on board and their sights set on Canada, they tapped producer Jace Lasek, a member of The Besnard Lakes who has produced albums from Suuns and Land of Talk, and has mixed and recorded for Wolf Parade, Sunset Rubdown and Patrick Watson. Lasek came on as a co-producer, collaborating with And The Kids and helping the band realize its sonic aesthetic on the album.Friends Share Lovers bursts forth with the pent-up emotionality of the opening track, aptly titled "Kick Rocks." Here drum climaxes interlock with hypnotic harmony vocals, building a tension that crashes like a wave cresting, leaving in its wake glassy flowing melodies. The thematic thread of relationships imbues the new wave elegance of "Friends Share Lovers"and "I Can't Tell What The Time Is Telling Me." The title track evokes a Smiths-like juxtaposition of balmy musicality set against poetic turmoil as Mohan wrestles with the complexities of a friendship sliding into a romance. The stunning "I Can't Tell What The Time Is Telling Me" envelops the listener with chiming guitars, oceanic synth textures, and sidesteps into classical melodic motifs. "That track is about getting through tough times with a new partner. It's about being true to yourself after you've fallen in love," Mohan explains. Closing the album is the ethereal "Pennies, Rice."It's a meditative track that rolls out slowly with measured grace. In some ways, it's something of a conceptual centerpiece. "This track is about having all the freedom in the world, but the only thing holding you back is your indecisiveness,"Mohan reveals. Friends Share Lovers is that pivotal release, the follow up to a well-received album from a promising young band. The new album showcases And The Kids' considerable powers manifesting into a triumphant record that justifies the earlier praise.However, for the members of And The Kids, the impact that matters the most to them is the bonds they make with their audience. To that end, Mohan says: "What's been most meaningful is realizing what a big influence a small band can have. We see women at the shows who say they want to play music and that we inspired them to do what they love."
Venue Information:
Black Sheep
2106 E. Platte Ave
Colorado Springs, CO, 80909
http://www.blacksheeprocks.com/